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Tag: racism

The Real World And Its History Of Exploiting Black Pain | Bossip

In the season finale Jenna’s friend said that Ceejai’ should go “pick cotton.” Then Jenna proceeded to call Ceejai’ “ratchet.” All of this boiled over to Ceejai’ attacking Jenna and leaving her with a Black eye. Ceejai’ gets kicked off the show, the fight goes viral and the show gets more buzz than any other time in years. All on the back of Black trauma.Real World has been around for almost 25 years and they’ve thrived on drama and conflict. Which is understandable because it’s a reality show. It’s just time for them to figure out some other way to manufacture that drama without using Black pain to get them there.And let’s remember that we’ve yet to see what happens in a season when White people are in a house outnumbered by Black people, let alone when there’s only one White person in a house full of Black people. It’d be interesting to see who looks “crazy” then.

Source: The Real World And Its History Of Exploiting Black Pain | Bossip

Black people have always been in the center ring on “The Real World.” Placing them in a house with six clueless white people and expecting things to go smoothly is always a recipe for disaster and entertainment. Bunim-Murray has profited off of this formula for 25 years. It’s time for a new formula.

Daily Kos: Most of you have no idea what Martin Luther King actually did

What most people who reference Dr. King seem not to know is how Dr. King actually changed the subjective experience of life in the United States for African Americans. And yeah, I said for African Americans, not for Americans, because his main impact was his effect on the lives of African Americans, not on Americans in general. His main impact was not to make white people nicer or fairer. That’s why some of us who are African Americans get a bit possessive about his legacy. Dr. Martin Luther King’s legacy, despite what our civil religion tells us, is not color blind.

via Daily Kos: Most of you have no idea what Martin Luther King actually did.

Scott Woods Makes Lists | What People Think Racism Is

Scott Woods Makes Lists | What People Think Racism Is.

This is brilliant.

Dear Ani DiFranco Supporters: You Cannot Reclaim an Oppression You Have Never Experienced

The absurdity of the racism displayed here is laughable: from the name, to the misuse of black vernacular, and the stolen picture. But the situation also highlights the necessity of emphasizing the interconnectedness of oppressions. You cannot fight for the equal rights of women and ignore the history of racism within this country.

Sad are the lengths some women will go to exclude the voices of Black women and lay claim to marginalization they have never experienced.

I have an inkling that if a man attempted to “reclaim” the word “bitch” or “cunt” these women would understand perfectly the error of misappropriation; however, white supremacy continues to obscure the realities of slavery.

via Dear Ani DiFranco Supporters: You Cannot Reclaim an Oppression You Have Never Experienced.

On Miley Cyrus and Racism – The Belle Jar Blog

What Miley is doing is cultural appropriation. She, a wealthy white woman, is taking elements from black culture in order to achieve a specific image. Her status as a member of a traditionally oppressive race and class means that she is able to pick and choose what parts of black culture she wants to embrace without having to deal with the racism and racialization that black women live with every day. In short, she can imagine that she is being “ghetto” without having any concept of what living in a ghetto would really mean.

Miley is doing her best to promote herself as a part of rachet culture, which Jody Rosen describes as “the potent sexual symbolism of black female bodies,” while simultaneously treating the black women in her videos and performances as props. She is taking elements of black culture and using them to give her the patina of street cred that she wants so badly. She is playing at being black without even trying to understand what the lived experience of being black really is. She is appropriating cultural elements without taking any time to reflect on her position of privilege and how her use of the term “ratchet” or her twerking are contributing to the oppression of black people.

The Belle Jar Blog

A brilliant take on this topic; both the post and the discussion taking place in the comment section are worth a read.

I am still trying to compose my thoughts on this, but I want to reference this post when I do, because we always attribute our sources.

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