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Tag: Martin Luther King Jr

Today we celebrate the legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. In the middle of this generation’s epic social justice movement, we remember the work of Dr. King while looking forward to what the work of the new leaders will bring.

Cover Story: “The Dream of Reconciliation” – The New Yorker

The cover art of next week’s New Yorker as drawn by Barry Blitt depicts Martin Luther King Jr. marching arm in arm with Eric Garner and NYPD Officer Wenjian Liu. In the background, we see Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown and an American Flag.

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I have several issues with this drawing. The first is, why is all the color removed from the people in the picture? Before Captain Facts or any other member of the #WellActually justice league can jump in my comments, let me say that I get what the artist may have intended, but the fact is, the murders of Garner, Martin, and Brown all had a basis in the fact that they were black, so removing their color in this drawing, in my opinion, is an attempt the erase the part that race/color played in their deaths.

Adding Dr. King to the picture could be considered a nice touch, and it definitely goes along with the theme of the article, but why is it that Dr. King is invoked so much by white people these days? When he was alive they wanted him to shut up. Now his name and memory are shouted from the mountaintops anytime anyone wants the angry black people to calm down. Please stop invoking the name, memory, and image of Dr. King as a means of trying to instill docility and quiet the righteous anger of black people in America. Dr. King was killed while demonstrating nonviolent resistance, so using him as a tool against the very people he was championing is more than a little insulting.

Why is Wenjian Liu even in this picture? The NYPD shooting was an isolated incident that had nothing to do with the deaths of Brown, Garner or Martin, so why is there this concerted effort by the media to rewrite the narrative and put them together? This is yet another version of #AllLivesMatter, which is in and of itself and attempt to water down the importance and significance of the movement that is happening in this country right now to save black lives.

This is not a Kumbaya moment. We are not going to emerge from this holding hands and singing gospel songs together. We are in the fight of our lives, and we demand the recognition of our humanity and our person-hood. Understand that until the genocide of black people in this country stops, the revolution will continue.

Here is what the artist had to say about his cover art for the New Yorker:

Barry Blitt drew next week’s cover, inspired by the photographs of the Selma-to-Montgomery march that are everywhere again. “It struck me that King’s vision was both the empowerment of African-Americans, the insistence on civil rights, but also the reconciliation of people who seemed so hard to reconcile,” he said. “In New York and elsewhere, the tension between the police and the policed is at the center of things. Like Trayvon Martin and Eric Garner, Michael Brown and Officers Wenjian Liu and Rafael Ramos, Martin Luther King was taken way too early. It is hard to believe things would have got as bad as they are if he was still around today.”

via Cover Story: “The Dream of Reconciliation” – The New Yorker.

Daily Kos: Most of you have no idea what Martin Luther King actually did

What most people who reference Dr. King seem not to know is how Dr. King actually changed the subjective experience of life in the United States for African Americans. And yeah, I said for African Americans, not for Americans, because his main impact was his effect on the lives of African Americans, not on Americans in general. His main impact was not to make white people nicer or fairer. That’s why some of us who are African Americans get a bit possessive about his legacy. Dr. Martin Luther King’s legacy, despite what our civil religion tells us, is not color blind.

via Daily Kos: Most of you have no idea what Martin Luther King actually did.

Fake RTs are an act of Twitter terrorism, and Paris Hilton found this out the hard way

In the wake of Nelson Mandela’s death on Dec. 5, many celebrities famous people tweeted words of respect and condolence. Some reflected on what his life and his work meant to them, and some simply thanked him for his service to the world. We live in a culture obsessed with celebrity, and any time a celebrity tweets, someone, somewhere will find a reason to share said tweet.

A tweet widely circulated yesterday and still making the rounds today (because god forbid anyone verify something for themselves instead of believing everything they see on the internet) is one that was falsely attributed to Paris Hilton.

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this is a screenshot of an earlier buzzfeed article on the same topic

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