the journalista

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Tag: journalism (page 1 of 3)

How Mike Brown’s Shooting and the Ferguson Protests Made Journalism Even More Important to Me

Ferguson, Missouri

Photo by Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images

When Mike Brown was killed in Ferguson, Mo., on Aug. 9, 2014, I was still in journalism school at Arizona State University, learning more about the effective use of social media and blogs and the impact they can have on social movements. I was not aware of how important that information was going to become for me until months later, when the movement to save black lives came to the forefront of our collective social conscience.

Read “Mike Brown, Ferguson, Mo., and How the Movement to Save Black Lives Changed the Way I Do Journalism

Good morning.

I’ve been up since 5:30 a.m. preparing to conduct one of the biggest interviews of my journalism career.

This is huge.

I was talking to my best friend last night about being fulfilled by the pursuit of our dreams, and living our best life because we are following our own paths.

Today is definitely a landmark event along those lines.

I am eternally grateful for the blessings and opportunities that continue to come up for me.

I promise to continue to do good work and be a representation of meaningful, ethical journalism.

Let’s all have a great day.

Who owns the Las Vegas Review-Journal?

Las Vegas Review-Journal staffers have a simple question for their new owner: Who are you?Several staffers at the Review-Journal, the largest media outlet in Nevada, have questioned their new owner’s decision to remain secret, an unusual arrangement that’s stunned not only the newsroom, but journalists nationwide. Sean Whaley, a capital bureau reporter based in Carson City, tweeted Saturday night that he was “offended & embarrassed” that the paper’s new owner — News + Media Capital Group LLC — has not disclosed its financial backers since announcing Thursday night that it had acquired the paper.

Source: Las Vegas Review-Journal Staffers Want To Know Who Owns Their Newspaper

I feel sorry for journalists in Las Vegas, who will find it extremely difficult to remain transparent and fair in their reporting since they don’t know who they work for.

What Happens When A Journalist Uses Your Tweets For A Story? (Part One)

(Co-written by Jamie Nesbitt Golden, originally published on Medium)

It all started with a ruined Wednesday morning.

A tweet of mine had found its way into a Washington Post op-ed calling for the dismissal of University of Missouri professors accused of assaulting students at a rally celebrating the resignation of the school president. Normally, this wouldn’t bother me; I’d grown accustomed to journalists using my tweets in their stories without giving me so much as a heads up (which usually leaves me open to trolling), and my Twitter account has never been private. But, as I’d spent the last 48 hours ridding my mentions of trolls wanting to debate First Amendment rights and freedom of the press, I was in no mood to entertain any more, and there was something about this particular post that stunk.

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Haiku #2 – Keywords and Phrases pt 2

new journalism: a first-person subjective media perspective

 

Jay Davis on the myth of objectivity in journalism

In addition to addressing the issue of objectivity in journalism, Jay Davis also gives 8 essential guidelines for reading between the lines and analyzing news stories.

How a sketchy news story can become “fact”

On February 7, Breitbart News’s Editor-at-Large Ben Shapiro published an explosive-looking story under the headline “Secret Hagel Donor? White House Ducks Question on ‘Friends of Hamas.'” Quoting “Senate sources,” Shapiro claimed that crucial documents on Hagel’s “foreign funding” might be kept from the Senate Armed Services Committe because “one of the names listed is a group purportedly called “Friends of Hamas.”

via “Friends of Hamas”: The Scary-Sounding Pro-Hagel Group That Doesn’t Actually Exist.

 

What is the real definition of tabloid?

As strange as it may sound given most of TMZ’s typical fare — on Tuesday, it posted photos of the socialite Paris Hilton buying a sandwich from a Manhattan Subway — the site’s aggressive coverage of these cases is part of a long journalistic history. Tabloids have always trafficked in gossip and scandal-mongering. The idea was never just to titillate, though; it was, at least in part, to hold the rich and powerful accountable.

“The tabloid was a rebellion against the established social order,” said Neal Gabler, the author of “Winchell: Gossip, Power and the Culture of Celebrity,” placing TMZ squarely in this tradition. “TMZ is an agent provocateur. It’s there to penetrate the veil so that the people on the inside cannot erect these barriers and protect themselves. And that’s what the tabloid is all about.”

via TMZ Broke Ray Rice, Donald Sterling and Jameis Winston Stories in 10-Month Span – NYTimes.com.

NPR’s diversity problem didn’t get any help from this reporter’s tweet

“It’s not easy to break into an unfamiliar community and find great sources on demand,” SPJ says. “If reporters develop some background first, they will be ready to hit the streets when they’re on deadline.”Kamenetz tried to explain the original tweet, saying, “Sometimes, it seems, majority voices are more eager to put themselves forward and respond to a media query.” But ultimately she recognized her own shortcomings.

via NPR’s diversity problem didn’t get any help from this reporter’s tweet.

Oops? If you are going to cover stories with diverse sources, perhaps you should begin the work of outreach before the deadline occurs?

For journalists, the interview is a key part of the story

Newspapers (10 issues of 'The Last Paper' by latitiudes-flickr on flickr)

Newspapers (10 issues of ‘The Last Paper’ by latitiudes-flickr on flickr)

There are two types of interviews. There’s the combative kind — “Councilman, can you explain why your department spent five trillion dollars on takeaway curry?” — and the collaborative kind — “Why yes, Mrs Miggins, please tell me how you built your cupcake business from scratch.”

via How to be interviewed — Thoughts On Journalism — Medium.

Ah yes. The art of the interview with a twist. Rob Boffard explains to potential subjects how to be interviewed by journalists. The information detailed is spot on, and highly recommended reading for everyone, journalists and non-journalists alike.

Mashable’s executive editor and chief content officer Jim Roberts and The Wall Street Journal’s emerging media editor Liz Heron talk about what publications can do to break free of the traditional news article.

I am having one of those days that affirms my career decision, and it feels so good

I want to remember this feeling of anticipation and excitement on the days when I can’t think of anything to write about. I want to remember it when I am having a hard time chasing that interview subject down.

I want to remember that I did the work and it paid off.

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