What Happens When A Journalist Uses Your Tweets For A Story? (Part One)

(Co-written by Jamie Nesbitt Golden, originally published on Medium)

It all started with a ruined Wednesday morning.

A tweet of mine had found its way into a Washington Post op-ed calling for the dismissal of University of Missouri professors accused of assaulting students at a rally celebrating the resignation of the school president. Normally, this wouldn’t bother me; I’d grown accustomed to journalists using my tweets in their stories without giving me so much as a heads up (which usually leaves me open to trolling), and my Twitter account has never been private. But, as I’d spent the last 48 hours ridding my mentions of trolls wanting to debate First Amendment rights and freedom of the press, I was in no mood to entertain any more, and there was something about this particular post that stunk.

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Fake RTs are an act of Twitter terrorism, and Paris Hilton found this out the hard way

In the wake of Nelson Mandela’s death on Dec. 5, many celebrities famous people tweeted words of respect and condolence. Some reflected on what his life and his work meant to them, and some simply thanked him for his service to the world. We live in a culture obsessed with celebrity, and any time a celebrity tweets, someone, somewhere will find a reason to share said tweet.

A tweet widely circulated yesterday and still making the rounds today (because god forbid anyone verify something for themselves instead of believing everything they see on the internet) is one that was falsely attributed to Paris Hilton.

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this is a screenshot of an earlier buzzfeed article on the same topic

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