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Month: December 2013

You were mostly good to me; goodbye, 2013

A great many things happened to me in 2013. Some good. Some not so good. Some awful. I wouldn’t change any part of this journey, because it has led me to this very moment. I dealt with the bad; I want to celebrate the good.

Pumpkin and his mommy on Christmas Day, 2013

Pumpkin and his mommy on Christmas Day, 2013

The arrival of my newest nephew, Pumpkin, is one of the great highlights of my year. I love this little old man so very much. From the top of his soft little head, all the way across that smoochable face with the chubby jowls and multiple chins; his baby fingers and his fat little feet. He is perfection personified, and I couldn’t be happier to have him call me Titi (when he finally talks).
2013 brought a few new people into my life, like the beautiful Kristina, pictured above. I am so thankful for her.

My first freelance assignment was front page, above the fold.

I spent quality time with people I love to have fun with.

We laughed and smiled a lot.


Sometimes we were downright silly.



My mom and dad did a lot to remind me that I am loved and valued and have a purpose. I am so grateful for that.

My brother is still my little brother in all the important ways, and that is cool with me.

There are many things, feelings, people, habits and thoughts that I will leave behind in 2013, but what I carry forward into 2014 starts on a foundation of love and understanding

Happy New Year to all of you.

Christian is my favorite. His YouTube videos are awesome, and here is the latest he has put together along with Katie Goodrich.

Dear Ani DiFranco Supporters: You Cannot Reclaim an Oppression You Have Never Experienced

The absurdity of the racism displayed here is laughable: from the name, to the misuse of black vernacular, and the stolen picture. But the situation also highlights the necessity of emphasizing the interconnectedness of oppressions. You cannot fight for the equal rights of women and ignore the history of racism within this country.

Sad are the lengths some women will go to exclude the voices of Black women and lay claim to marginalization they have never experienced.

I have an inkling that if a man attempted to “reclaim” the word “bitch” or “cunt” these women would understand perfectly the error of misappropriation; however, white supremacy continues to obscure the realities of slavery.

via Dear Ani DiFranco Supporters: You Cannot Reclaim an Oppression You Have Never Experienced.

A&E’s ‘Duck Dynasty’ Stunt is a Textbook Example of Media Manipulation | BenHebert.com

Here’s what happened:

A wealthy religious Southern man told GQ an interview that he believes homosexuality is a sin.

My initial response is who the f*&# cares. It’s not right, but does one person’s opinion have any bearing or effect on my life? No. But after witnessing the reactions, I thought I’d inform you on how you’re being manipulated.

First –

The quotes came from an interview. Not a random run-in with TMZ or drunk Charlie Sheen tirade, a scheduled interview. If for one second you think that Phil Robertson of ‘Duck Dynasty’ isn’t coached by a public relations team prior, you’re an idiot.

They knew what he was going to say and they embraced it.

This situation is a textbook example of feeding the monster, a form of media manipulation performed by expert marketers that may or may not have a conscience. It’s about the millionth time the stunt been done right in front of you this year.

via A&E’s ‘Duck Dynasty’ Stunt is a Textbook Example of Media Manipulation | BenHebert.com.

The Twitter Mob Mentality

Why We Should All Fear The Righteous Online Mob – Huffington Post

Today, a tasteless joke could make you a target. Tomorrow, it may be an unpopular, but valid, idea — like taxing soft drinks, or instituting quotas for female board members.

Online vigilantism “is likely to lead to a greater culture of censorship — in particular, the stifling of alternative voices and opinions,” Hardaker wrote in an email. “[W]e find people defending this strategy of intimidating, threatening, and ultimately silencing others as ‘free speech,’ seemingly oblivious to the irony that in doing so, they are actively engaged in censorship.”

Already the denouncers succeed almost immediately in silencing their targets. Closing her social media accounts makes Sacco the rule, not the exception. But the mass vengeance not only muzzles those who’ve done something wrong, it scares others into a kind of submissive silence. Sacco’s experience warns everyone else that there is no tolerance for deviance from the amorphous, but rigidly defended, ethics of the mob. You can say what you please, so long as it pleases the crowd.

via Why We Should All Fear The Righteous Online Mob.

I’m now feeling like I should not have read all of those reviews of  The Wolf of Wall Street prior to seeing it. I now have all these weird expectations about it that weren’t there before. I’m worried about watching this with my parents and nephew being awkward.

My Instagram video cover is the picture Lamont and I took on New Year’s. The number one picture in the video (by likes) is the picture I took of my parents on Mother’s Day at the Penthouse at the Huntley. 

 

Fake RTs are an act of Twitter terrorism, and Paris Hilton found this out the hard way

In the wake of Nelson Mandela’s death on Dec. 5, many celebrities famous people tweeted words of respect and condolence. Some reflected on what his life and his work meant to them, and some simply thanked him for his service to the world. We live in a culture obsessed with celebrity, and any time a celebrity tweets, someone, somewhere will find a reason to share said tweet.

A tweet widely circulated yesterday and still making the rounds today (because god forbid anyone verify something for themselves instead of believing everything they see on the internet) is one that was falsely attributed to Paris Hilton.

image

this is a screenshot of an earlier buzzfeed article on the same topic

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