Each fruit and vegetable in our stores has a unique history of nutrient loss, I’ve discovered, but there are two common themes. Throughout the ages, our farming ancestors have chosen the least bitter plants to grow in their gardens. It is now known that many of the most beneficial phytonutrients have a bitter, sour or astringent taste. Second, early farmers favored plants that were relatively low in fiber and high in sugar, starch and oil. These energy-dense plants were pleasurable to eat and provided the calories needed to fuel a strenuous lifestyle. The more palatable our fruits and vegetables became, however, the less advantageous they were for our health.

from “Breeding the Nutrition Out Of Our Food”, NYT

 

“I remember back in the days, you’d go visit someone at their house, and you’d look at their bookshelf and/or vinyl collection and you’d pretty much know who you were dealing with and whether you’d be compatible as friends (and in some cases as lovers or partners). But today I wonder, now that so many people have digital collections of everything, how we’ll any longer have this ability to know a person’s character by the music they listen to or books they read. I doubt we’ll become a generation of people who look into other people’s phones, iPads, or Kindles just to figure this sort of stuff out.”

– from “What Happened To Knowing More About A Person By The Books And Vinyl On Their Shelves?  by Lynne d Johnson

“So with the question, “How’s the whole ‘writercomedything’ going?” satisfactorily answered, the next question from my friends is “So how’s the LA dating scene?” 

 My answer always disappoints because, honestly, I haven’t done much (any) dating. I made an agreement with myself that I would spend my first year in LA establishing the groundwork for a successful comedy writing career, which for me, necessarily means not focusing on men. 
 I made this agreement with myself because I really enjoy the company of men. I’m also easily distracted by them.”